The lost record shops of Paris, France

From CityLab:

For Paris-based record collector Thomas Henry, the history of vinyl is particularly fascinating. For years, he’s been amassing 78 rpm records, shellac-based phonographic discs made between 1898 and 1950. He even runs a blog about this era of recorded music. Now, he’s putting together a comprehensive map of the record stores that operated in Paris starting at the very end of 19th century and on into the first half of the 20th (the website is in French).

Disquaires de Paris (Record Stores of Paris) is an interactive guide to the city’s record shop scene from 1890 through 1960, with archival materials that connect to each pinpointed store.

The lost record shops of Paris, France

Are print magazines the new vinyl records?

From the Guardian:

Very much like upstart new magazines in previous decades (Sniffin’ Gluethe Modern Reviewthe Idler), these new magazines have emerged partly as personal passion, partly as calling cards for young designers and would-be journalists, keeping production costs low. And because many are created by recent graduates they’re less hidebound by traditional magazine structure. But these magazines are also a result of the possibilities offered by the new technology that was supposed to kill print culture – they sell and distribute online, they crowdfund, they invent their own business models on the hoof. Works That Work, a design magazine for non-designers, created a social distribution model where readers got paid for delivering magazines to bookstores. As editor Peter Bil’ak explains in issue two, readers moved this idea on, distributing directly to friends, bypassing the middlemen. So, when readers order 10 or more copies, they get them for half price, the discount available for conventional distributors.

Are print magazines the new vinyl records?

How vinyl records are made (1956)

Spotted on Boing Boing, an awesome video:

Here’s an excellent 1956 RCA Victor promotional documentary about how vinyl records are made. More than 50 years later, the basic process remains the same even as the number of pressing plants has dwindled, driving up the price of new platters.

As my friend Bones said:

Everyone involved is so well turned-out. You won’t see a lathe cutting engineer with a tie clip these days. The woman testing the metal mould is great, too. “She loves it.”

How vinyl records are made (1956)