Urbex photographs of the nightmare that was Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum

Lancaster Moor Hospital

Growing up in Lancaster, the old Moor Hospital used to terrify me. Originally known as the Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum, it was a large complex of imposing Victorian buildings, purpose built from the early 1800s onwards to house people not deemed fit to live with the rest of us. I dread to think how many people were taken there against their will for the flimsiest of reasons, and what kind of “treatment” they endured.

Today the site is being renovated. Already you can buy a luxury home at The Residence, as it is now is known, for upwards of £300k.

The photos above and below were taken by a team of urban explorers going by the names of Ben, Beardy, Travis and Chard in 2013, before the renovations began. I love their work. You should check out more here.

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See more photos of the Lancaster Moor Hospital, and other locations, here.

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Urbex photographs of the nightmare that was Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum

Lucinda Grange stands tall

From the Guardian:

British adventure photographer Lucinda Grange has travelled the world, scaling famous buildings and structures and taking pictures from the top. Among her impressive list of climbs is the Great Pyramid of Giza, Firth of Forth Rail Bridge in Scotland and the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges. Photographs: Lucinda Grange/Barcroft USA.

Lucinda Grange stands tall

Urban exploration

Late that night, I met Garrett again at Blackfriars Bridge, at low tide. Two of his friends joined us: Scott and Alex. Our plan was to lift a manhole cover and drop into the Victorian sewer tunnels through which flows the Fleet, one of London’s “lost rivers”. Garrett wanted to show me the Fleet Chamber, a vast Bazalgettian structure near the outfall into the Thames. We had waders and headtorches ready to go. Garrett was mildly concerned about flow levels in the Fleet, due to the day’s rain.

“We’ll get in there and have a look. If it’s running too high, we’ll just turn around and come out.”

Read the article

Urban exploration