Everybody Street – New York City Street Photography (Trailer)

I need to watch this documentary asap. From Wired:

BEING A STREET photographer is a bit like conducting a drunk symphony: You must make order of chaos. Only a few photographers do it well, and many of them appear in Cheryl Dunn’s film, Everybody Street, which chronicles the street photography of New York City.

Dunn chose New York because it always has been at the center of the genre. Many a shooter has made a career documenting the city’s colorful characters, and many of street photography’s most iconic photographs were shot in one of its boroughs.

“If you want to get a really broad slice of humanity, you can find it in New York,” Dunn says. “Every kind of person is out there and I think that’s what’s attracted all these photographers.”

Camel Coats, 5th Avenue, New York City, 1975. Photo by: Joel Meyerowitz.

USA. New York City. 1959. Brooklyn Gang.Photo by: Bruce Davidson/Magnum

Photo by: Jamel Shabazz

Everybody Street – New York City Street Photography (Trailer)

Finding Vivian Maier

I finally watched Finding Vivian Maier. It’s as good as I hoped it would be. I’ve previously posted some of her discovered photos. Be sure to watch the documentary, and to buy the book of her street photography.

Finding Vivian Maier is the critically acclaimed documentary about a mysterious nanny, who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that were hidden in storage lockers and, discovered decades later, is now among the 20th century’s greatest photographers. Directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, Maier’s strange and riveting life and art are revealed through never before seen photographs, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her.

Maier’s massive body of work would come to light when in 2007 her work was discovered at a local thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side. From there, it would eventually impact the world over and change the life of the man who championed her work and brought it to the public eye, John Maloof.

 

Finding Vivian Maier

Finding Vivien Maier

I can’t wait to watch Finding Vivien Maier. From the New York Times:

An exciting electric current of discovery runs through “Finding Vivian Maier,” a documentary about a street photographer who never exhibited her work. She scarcely shared it even with those who knew her. Then again, many of her acquaintances when she was taking some of her remarkable images, particularly in and around Chicago in the 1950s and ’60s, were the children she cared for while working as a nanny. Later in her life, some of those children took care of her in turn, first by moving her into an apartment and then the nursing home where she died in 2009. What rotten timing: She was on the verge of being discovered, first as a curiosity and then as a social-media sensation and a mystery.

It’s no surprise that Maier is now the subject of a documentary, given the quality of her work, the nominal exoticism of her life and the secrets that still drift around her. She’s a terrific story — part Mary Poppins, part Weegee — who was at once emancipated and in service. She was introduced to the world, as it were, by John Maloof, one of this movie’s directors, who bought a box of her negatives at a Chicago auction in 2007 for about $400. The auction house, he explains, told him the work was by Maier, but he found nothing about her on Google. He had purchased the negatives for a book he was working on, but after deciding that they were of no use, he stashed the box away.

And then he took it out again, scanned some images and put them up on Flickr.

Finding Vivien Maier

Flo: Portrait of a Street Photographer

From New York Times:

As a young, self-described “hot chick” in the ’70s and ’80s, Flo Fox hung out at Studio 54 and Area, in the same social circle as Andy Warhol and photographers like Andre Kertesz and Lisette Model. Today, worlds away from those underground art parties, she lives in an apartment building for disabled people, surviving with the help of Medicaid and Social Security.

Ms. Fox was born blind in one eye and was orphaned as a teenager. At 26, she purchased her first camera and embarked on a career in photography. When she turned 30, she developed multiple sclerosis. Now she has lost much of the vision in her other eye, is triplegic, and several years ago was given a diagnosis of lung cancer. Yet she is as sassy as ever and continues to do what she loves most: take photographs. When holding the camera became impossible, she started to instruct her aides to take photographs for her. Her often humorous and ironic (and sometimes raunchy) photographs depict the gritty side of New York City street life.

Flo: Portrait of a Street Photographer