Sleeping cars at night

Sleeping Cars

Gerd Ludwig takes photographs of solitary cars at night in Los Angeles and posts them on Instagram.

Sleeping Cars Sleeping CarsSleeping Cars

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Sleeping cars at night

Urbex photographs of the nightmare that was Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum

Lancaster Moor Hospital

Growing up in Lancaster, the old Moor Hospital used to terrify me. Originally known as the Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum, it was a large complex of imposing Victorian buildings, purpose built from the early 1800s onwards to house people not deemed fit to live with the rest of us. I dread to think how many people were taken there against their will for the flimsiest of reasons, and what kind of “treatment” they endured.

Today the site is being renovated. Already you can buy a luxury home at The Residence, as it is now is known, for upwards of £300k.

The photos above and below were taken by a team of urban explorers going by the names of Ben, Beardy, Travis and Chard in 2013, before the renovations began. I love their work. You should check out more here.

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See more photos of the Lancaster Moor Hospital, and other locations, here.

Urbex photographs of the nightmare that was Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum

Janet Delaney’s photographs of New York in the 80s

American, Staten Island Ferry, 1985
American, Staten Island Ferry, 1985

Some photographers know how to make you feel alive, even when the moments they capture are long gone by the time you see them. I love the work of Janet Delaney, and I encourage you to seek out more of her photographs, and to buy prints from her website.

6am on the Staten Island Ferry, 1985
6am on the Staten Island Ferry, 1985
Coffee and a Sandwich, 1985
Coffee and a Sandwich, 1985
Event at City Hall, 1985
Event at City Hall, 1985
Manhattan Bridge, 1987
Manhattan Bridge, 1987
Painter, SoHo, 1984
Painter, SoHo, 1984
Woman with Tree, 1987
Woman with Tree, 1987
$2.00 Contribution, SoHo Party, 1985
Janet Delaney’s photographs of New York in the 80s

Beautiful photographs of Algiers, Algeria, from 1899

Moonlight view, with lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria][ca. 1899].
Moonlight view, with lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
A very good friend of mine, Hicham Yezza, recently discovered a beautiful collection of photos of his home country of Algeria from 1899.

I asked Hich for his thoughts on the photographs:

“The photos evoke quite mixed feelings in me. They are exquisite portraits of a bygone era. They are also a record of colonial conquest and domination, of how a land was transformed by the arrival of a European power. Above all, they are a remarkable record of a beautiful landscape, most of which has been lost in the century since, to wars, to capitalism, to modernity.”

One day I would love to visit these places, to see them for myself, and to see how they have changed.

The cemetery, with chapel, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
The cemetery, with chapel, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Cathedral, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Cathedral, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Street of the camels, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Street of the camels, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Group, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899]
Group of Arabs, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899]
Moorish coffee house, Algiers, Algeria [ca 1899].
Moorish coffee house, Algiers, Algeria [ca 1899].
Government place, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Government place, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Moorish woman and child on the terrace, II, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Moorish woman and child on the terrace, II, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Market, Biskra, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Market, Biskra, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Luce Ben Aben, School of Arab Embroidery, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Luce Ben Aben, School of Arab Embroidery, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Museum: entrance hall, II, Algiers, Algeria
Museum: entrance hall, II, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1999].
Merchants of eatables, Bona, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Merchants of eatables, Bona, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Screenshot 2015-08-17 16.30.06
Luce Ben Aben, Moorish women preparing couscous, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Distinguished Moorish women, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Distinguished Moorish women, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
Harbor by moonlight, II, Algiers, Algeria
Harbor by moonlight, II, Algiers, Algeria [ca. 1899].
View the full collection here.

Beautiful photographs of Algiers, Algeria, from 1899

The goal posts of Brazil

A goal post is seen in Tavares Bastos slum in Rio de Janeiro May 18, 2014. (REUTERS/Pilar Olivares)

From CityLab:

With the sport so deeply engrained into its culture, goal posts of all shapes, materials, and sizes can be found from its beaches to its favelas. Recently, Reuters photographers captured the many kinds of official and unofficial goal posts to be found around the country.

A goal post is seen in Rio de Janeiro May 23, 2014. (REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes)
A series of goal posts are seen in Brasilia April 29, 2014. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
A goal post is seen in Rio de Janeiro May 23, 2014. (REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes)
Vultures perch on a goal post in the Mare slum complex of Rio de Janeiro March 30, 2014. (REUTERS/Sergio Moraes)
The goal posts of Brazil

When the Hollywood sign said Hollywoodland

From Southland:

Looking at photos of the Hollywood Sign in its early years is a little like seeing the Statue of Liberty with a third arm, or the Golden Gate Bridge with a second deck. The sign has become such an effective icon of Los Angeles that we assume its present configuration must conform to its Platonic ideal.

But when those white, sans-serif block letters first rose from the face of Mount Lee in 1923, they were simply a real-estate advertisement, not a cultural symbol, and there were four more of them: L-A-N-D. The thirteen letters—illuminated at night by 4,000 incandescent bulbs—promoted the Hollywoodland subdivision to the rest of the booming city of Los Angeles. And as Leo Braudy writes in his authoritative history of the sign, they were meant to be seen from an automobile; the sign’s principal designers, publicist John D. Roche and Los Angeles Timespublisher Harry Chandler, scaled the letters—50 feet tall by 30 feet wide—to be read from Wilshire Boulevard.

When the Hollywood sign said Hollywoodland