Norway has the best design: first beautiful banknotes, now perfect passports

From the Guardian:

If the passport is a symbol of national identity, then the new design for Norway’s travel documents has undoubtedly cemented the country’s reputation as a land of sleek, minimalist beauty.

This week, Norway’s National Police Directorate announced the winners of a competition launched in February to find a new design concept for the nation’s passports and ID card.

The winning entry, by Oslo design studio Neue, features beautifully simplified depictions of Norway’s natural landscapes drawn with fine lines in pastel shades. The cover features a modernised version of the national crest, stamped in gold on unusually bold colours: either white, turquoise or red for immigrant, diplomat and standard passports respectively. […]

Passports aren’t the only national symbol the state has opened up to the country’s design teams. Last month – as a result of a similar competition – Norges Bank picked proposals from design studios Snøhetta and The Metric System for their new kroner notes. Pixelated and also featuring bold colours, the new notes are due to be released in 2017.

From

Advertisements
Norway has the best design: first beautiful banknotes, now perfect passports

Slow television is a thing

From Kottke.org:

Slow television is the uninterrupted broadcast of an ordinary event from start to finish. Early efforts included burning Yule logs on TV around Christmas and driver’s views of complete British rail journeys (not to mention Andy Warhol and the pitch drop experiment), but Norwegian public television has revived the format in recent years. The first broadcast was of a 7-hour train trip from Bergen to Oslo, which was watched at some point by ~20% of Norway’s population. You can watch the entire thing on YouTube.

Not content with that, in 2011 an entire ship voyage was broadcast for 134 continuous hours. The entire voyage is available for viewing, but you can watch a 37-minute time lapse of the whole thing if you can’t spare the 5½ days:

As the show progressed and the ratings climbed (half of the Norwegian population tuned in at some point), the show became an interactive event, with people meeting the ship along to coast in order to appear as extras in the cast. Some even followed in smaller boats, filming as they went along in the ship’s wake.

Slow television is a thing