The lost record shops of Paris, France

From CityLab:

For Paris-based record collector Thomas Henry, the history of vinyl is particularly fascinating. For years, he’s been amassing 78 rpm records, shellac-based phonographic discs made between 1898 and 1950. He even runs a blog about this era of recorded music. Now, he’s putting together a comprehensive map of the record stores that operated in Paris starting at the very end of 19th century and on into the first half of the 20th (the website is in French).

Disquaires de Paris (Record Stores of Paris) is an interactive guide to the city’s record shop scene from 1890 through 1960, with archival materials that connect to each pinpointed store.

The lost record shops of Paris, France

Life after death for the Paris Métro ghost stations?

I love this kind of stuff. From the always brilliant Atlantic Cities:

The Paris Métro, opened in 1900, extends over more than 200 kilometers of track, serving more than 300 individual stops. But there are 11 more stations that, though once built, now stand nearly abandoned. Many of these “ghost” or “phantom” stations shuttered after the occupation during WWII. Two of them, Porte Molitor and Haxo, never opened at all.

Parisian mayoral candidate Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet has a bold plan for these phantom stations. The center-right candidate, known as NKM to her supporters, has argued that these abandoned spaces should be reclaimed for the city’s residents.

To envision what these future public spaces could look like, NKM teamed up with architect Manal Rachdi and urban planner Nicolas Laisné. They drew up a few crazy-looking renderings to get started, starting with Arsenal, a 4th arrondissement station closed since 1939. She has pledged to solicit more inventive ideas if elected (though her opponent, Socialist Anne Hidalgo, is the frontrunner).

Life after death for the Paris Métro ghost stations?

Eric Cantona on being free

I don’t care about the past. It was great but I don’t want to think about it. I want to look forward. I don’t know where my medals are. Nothing. No shirt. Nothing. I played for France 45 times. We got two shirts for every game, so that’s 90. I don’t have even one. You can feel very quickly a prisoner of your past. Of your memories. I prefer to be free and think about tomorrow.

Eric Cantona on being free

My great-great-grandfather, Joseph Henry Luschwitz

It’s funny how life turns out.

For example, my great-great-grandfather on my mother’s side, Joseph Henry Luschwitz, was an eminent German musician, who on a tour of Europe was invited by Salar Jung the First, the Nizam of Hyderabad, to come to India and start a band for the state.

Joseph became State Director of Music and decided to settle in India.  Three generations of my family lived there including my grandmother (Mary, daughter of Henry Luschwitz and Nina Moraes, the latter of French and Portuguese descent). Mary married and had two children before a motorcycle accident claimed the life of her first husband.

And then came the Second World War. My grandfather, Joseph Glover, who was born in Dublin, was conscripted into the RAF and posted to India, then still a British Colony. There he met my widowed grandmother, they married, moved to the UK, and had twins, one of which was my mother.

Yep, it’s funny how life turns out.

My great-great-grandfather, Joseph Henry Luschwitz

The art of 1930s French pharmaceutical ads

Ad for Irradiated Opocalcium from the collection of Jérôme Dubois / 50 Watts

When I was a teenager I started buying imports of US music magazines. One thing I remember are the pharmaceutical ads, which were strange to me because in the UK such ads weren’t permitted. They were many things, but they were never artistic. So it’s interesting to see this collection of 24 Pharmaceutical Ads from 1930s France, curated by Jérôme Dubois via 50 Watts.

The art of 1930s French pharmaceutical ads