The projection booth

From Wired:

WORKING THE PROJECTION booth at Avon Cinema was like a second film school for Taylor Umphenour. The single-screen theater on the east side of Providence, Rhode Island—a favorite among Brown and Rhode Island School of Design students—provided a sublime mix of unlimited free movies and a century’s worth of cinematic innovation.

The nine-year education would prove invaluable to the aspiring filmmaker. But as much as Umphenour cherished the analog world of carbon rods, lenses, and aperture plates, by 2011 it was clear film was dying—or at least fading into a specialty medium.

[…] for two years the owner allowed Umphenour to photograph and film what has become a relic in most US movie theaters: the 35mm projection booth. “I saw that there was an opportunity to take people into this vanishing world,” he says, “a world that was also deliberately kept in the shadows, unseen for almost a century that it existed.”

The projection booth

A lost cinema in the Egyptian desert

I’d love to go out there with a projector and a screen. From HUH:

Estonian photographer Kaupo Kikkas has found and documented an old abandoned cinema in the middle of Egypt’s Sinai desert. According to the photographer, the place was built by a crazy Frenchman with money to spare, but sadly no film was ever shown there – on opening night the generator cut out.

While tours do pass close by to the abandoned space, it seems as though the cinema is going to be left alone and unused for a while to come. You can take a look at it using Google Maps as well.

A lost cinema in the Egyptian desert

Russia’s dying movie theatres

I love stuff like this. Maybe it’s a northern thing. From The Calvert Journal:

With more and more cinemas in Russia losing out to multiplexes, photographer Sergey Novikov sought to capture the old buildings in their new incarnations — sometimes abandoned, sometimes used for discos and fairs or taken over by Jehovah’s Witnesses. Breathless was shot in Moscow and St Petersburg between 2010 and 2011 by Novikov, a graduate of the Rodchenko Moscow School of Photography and Multimedia. “I prefer an engrossing film to disgusting popcorn,” he says. “I don’t mind shifting about in a squeaky chair, soaking in the atmosphere of an old cinema. Unfortunately, the films have already left them.” Novikov’s work, which has been published in magazines such as Russian Esquire and Italian Rolling Stone, covers a wide range of subjects from Belgian beer to Icelandic landscapes. In 2011, he self-published FC Volga United, a book of photos about football fans who live along the Volga, Europe’s longest river.

Russia’s dying movie theatres