Picture books of New York

I am always on the lookout for new picture books to buy for my two sons, Oscar (6) and Mateo (2). So I can’t wait to dig into the these:

“Wow . . . New York! Just like I pictured it. Skyscrapers and everything.” So murmurs a presumably wide-eyed newcomer during a spoken-word break in Stevie Wonder’s “Living for the City,” and who among us outlanders and former rubes did not feel that same sense of mingled recognition and awe when we first set foot here? Thanks to movies and TV, magazines, the news, books — iconography in general — all of us, even natives, carry a mental suitcase stuffed with received images of the Big Apple. That’s true of children, too, for whom the city’s superlatives (biggest, loudest, tallest) hold a special fascination. You might even say that New York is to other American cities what dinosaurs are to other animals — minus, one hopes, the extinction event. And if we are — or were — lucky children, picture books play a huge role in how we picture the city, from “Eloise” and “The Snowy Day” to “Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile,” “In the Night Kitchen,” “You Can’t Take a Balloon Into the Metropolitan Museum” and “The Man Who Walked Between the Towers.”

Read the full review here.

 

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Picture books of New York