The future according to Her

A fascinating look at what makes Her so special from Vulture:

Blue-less Color Palette
Cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema talking to HitFix:
“Van Hoytema says he was very meticulous about eliminating the color blue. It’s not that he has anything against blue, of course, but he felt that if they restricted a primary color like that, it would elevate the richness of the film’s look and give it a unity. ‘It’s very easy to say we want everything to be warm, but what is warm,’ he asks rhetorically. ‘It was not only that we wanted to colors to be warm but we wanted colors to have a specific identity.'”

Lack of Cars
KK Barrett talking to the L.A. Times:
“Part of the reason we avoided cars is because we wanted to avoid street scenes in general. It’s just too recognizably of an era, and then it would place it in a time, even a future time, which we didn’t want. When you have cars then half the audience starts thinking about the great cars they might have. We wanted trains and elevated walkways, which allowed us to avoid that, and seemed right anyway. Plus in your car you already have another barrier from human contact that you don’t have in public transit. And this movie is about human contact and connection.” 

Keyboard-less Computer
Barrett talking to the L.A. Times:
“I’m always amused at how in science-fiction, shows like’Star Trek,’ there are all these buttons and flashing lights. That never made sense to me. It seems to me like if you could you would just have direct communication with the computer. Also, a keyboard would have dated us. 

The Phone
From the New York profile of Jonze:
“The look of which was inspired by a vintage Deco cigarette lighter that Jonze and production designer K. K. Barrett found in an L.A. antiques store.”

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2 thoughts on “The future according to Her

  1. Excellent post! Very insightful. I didn’t know they avoided blue on purpose, but it makes sense. Still the film feels kind of cold (emotionally), which is very interesting.

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